Greg Mason Burns

I create art that makes you feel and think. My art is a dialogue between my intellectual and aesthetic approach and your interpretation; however, you may want to do that. The goal is to get you to feel what you are seeing, and for that feeling to continue into your home.

My work is diverse and includes, among others: abstract, contemporary, landscape, portrait, color field, minimalism, photography, and reductive art. Some of these styles blend together, while others stand alone. I am inspired by the moment, and maintain a freedom to create what needs to be created, using whichever medium and technique is most appropriate such as: oil, watercolor, charcoal, oil pastel, photography, acrylic, collage, murals, or videography, etc.

What is art to you? What drives you to like art? Come in and discover what conversations we can have together. 

No matter what your approach to art is, you can browse colors and textures or go deeper and explore specific projects like Reception Theory, where I create inside the gap that exists between what is said and what is understood.

Likewise, you might also enjoy two of my other projects:

Art is to be discovered here. Welcome.

Greg Mason Burns
Greg Mason Burns in his studio

Portfolio Highlights

What's New

Experiments in Watercolor: Diversity in Luminosity

Experiments in Watercolor: Diversity in Luminosity

  Experiments in Watercolor: Diversity in Luminosity, is a seven-artist exhibit that I have both curated and am in as an artist. The show runs at the UMVA Gallery at 516 Congress Street in Portland, Maine for the month of May, 2022. The artists, including me, are: Alan Crichton, Arthur Nichols, Liz Prescott, Rabee Kiwan, Ed Nadeau, and Jack Silverio. I created this exhibit as an attempt to show how watercolor has many varieties of work. I believe most people think of watercolor as great washes of landscapes and portraits. But I have often worked in the abstract, and many

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Walking on Both Sides Part 3 is a mixed media collage using newspaper headlines to contrast reality.

Manipulation of the Art Market

The manipulation of the art market is the stuff of legends and actually pretty transparent. It’s run “in secrecy” by the super wealthy in a way to make them more wealthy. It’s about intimidation, and that game works for them. This is why I always tell people to buy what they like. Don’t buy art to match the décor (the art will outlast the décor) and don’t buy art to compete as an investor either (the game is rigged before you even enter it). Artists suffer the worst consequences, but there is a way to solve this: buy local artists

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